Copyright Notice

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Copyright © 2012 – 2018 Joshua Rosato

All rights reserved.

 

Ownership of Copyright

The copyright in this website and the material on this website (including without limitation the text, computer code, artwork, photographs, images, music, audio material, video material and audio-visual material on this website) is owned by JOSHUAROSATO.COM and its licensors.

 

Copyright License

JOSHUAROSATO.COM grants to you a worldwide non-exclusive royalty-free revocable license to:

  • view this website and the material on this website on a computer or mobile device via a web browser;
  • copy and store this website and the material on this website in your web browser cache memory; and
  • print pages from this website for your own personal and non-commercial use.

JOSHUAROSATO.COM does not grant you any other rights in relation to this website or the material on this website.   In other words, all other rights are reserved.

For the avoidance of doubt, you must not adapt, edit, change, transform, publish, republish, distribute, redistribute, broadcast, rebroadcast or show or play in public this website or the material on this website (in any form or media) without JOSHUAROSATO.COM’s prior written permission.

 

Data Mining

The automated and/or systematic collection of data from this website is prohibited.

 

Permissions

You may request permission to use the copyright materials on this website by writing to [email protected]

 

Enforcement of Copyright

JOSHUAROSATO.COM takes the protection of its copyright very seriously.

If JOSHUAROSATO.COM discovers that you have used its copyright materials in contravention of the license above, JOSHUAROSATO.COM may bring legal proceedings against you seeking monetary damages and an injunction to stop you using those materials.  You could also be ordered to pay legal costs.

If you become aware of any use of JOSHUAROSATO.COM’s copyright materials that contravenes or may contravene the license above, please report this by email to [email protected]

 

Infringing Material

If you become aware of any material on the website that you believe infringes your or any other person’s copyright, please report this by email to [email protected]

 

COPYRIGHT AND FAIR USE

 

We are a publishing, rather than a file sharing platform, so copyrighted materials are often used in commentary, journalism, or the transformation of the material into something original of their own. As such, it’s important to consider if the manner in which the material is used falls under fair use, before submitting a DMCA notice. Under Section 512(f) of the DMCA, any person who knowingly materially misrepresents that material or activity is infringing is liable for:

…any damages, including costs and attorneys’ fees, incurred by the alleged infringer, by any copyright owner or copyright owner’s authorized licensee, or by a service provider, who is injured by such misrepresentation, as the result of the service provider relying upon such misrepresentation in removing or disabling access to the material or activity claimed to be infringing, or in replacing the removed material or ceasing to disable access to it.

Please note that we may seek to collect those damages. We have filed lawsuits against copyright owners for submitting fraudulent DMCA notices, and reserve the right to do so in the future as recourse for notices we deem to be improper. This includes DMCA notices aimed at uses of copyrighted content that we believe to be fair. Additionally, you are required to give consideration to whether a use of material is fair before submitting a takedown notification.

 

What Is Fair Use?

There aren’t hard and fast rules when it comes to defining fair use. However, the Copyright Act sets out four factors for courts to consider:

  1. The purpose and character of the use: Why and how is the material used? Using content for criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship or research is usually fair. Additionally, using material in a transformative manner, that is to say, in a manner that adds new expression, meaning, or insight, is also more likely to be considered fair use over an exact reproduction of a work. What’s more, nonprofit use is favored over commercial use.
  2. The nature of the copyrighted work: Is the original factual or fiction, published or unpublished? Factual and published works are less protected, so its use is more likely to be considered fair.
  3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole: How much of the material is used? If the “heart” (the most memorable or significant portion) or the majority of a work wasn’t used, it’s more likely to be considered fair.
  4. The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work: Does the use target a different market/audience? If so, it’s more likely to be fair use. It’s important to note that although criticism or parody may reduce a market, it still may be fair because of its transformative nature. In other words, if the criticism of a product influences people to stop buying the product, that doesn’t count as having an “effect on the market for the work” under copyright law.

 

Here are some resources to learn more about fair use:

 

The above document has been adapted from WordPress.com.

 

Digital Millennium Copyright Act Policy

 

EMAIL: [email protected]
Before filing a DMCA complaint, please read the above section regarding Fair Use.

 

We respect the intellectual property rights of others just as we expect others to respect our rights. Pursuant to Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Title 17, United States Code, Section 512(c), a copyright owner or their agent may submit a takedown notice to us via our DMCA Agent listed below. As an internet service provider, we are entitled to claim immunity from said infringement claims pursuant to the “safe harbor” provisions of the DMCA. To submit a good faith infringement claim to us, you must submit notice to us that sets forth the following information:

 

Notice of Infringement – Claim

  1. A physical or electronic signature of the copyright owner (or someone authorized to act on behalf of the owner);
  2. Identification of the copyrighted work claimed to have been infringed;
  3. Identification of the infringing material to be removed, and information reasonably sufficient to permit the service provider to locate the material. (Please submit the URL of the page in question to assist us in identifying the allegedly offending work);
  4. Information reasonably sufficient to permit the service provider to contact the complaining party including your name, physical address, email address, phone number and fax number;
  5. A statement that the complaining party has a good faith belief that the use of the material is unauthorized by the copyright agent; and
  6. A statement that the information in the notification is accurate, and, under penalty of perjury, that the complaining party is authorized to act on behalf of the copyright owner.

Title 17 USC §512(f) provides civil damage penalties, including costs and attorney fees, against any person who knowingly and materially misrepresents certain information in a notification of infringement under 17 USC §512(c)(3).

Send all takedown notices to the email provided, both at the top and bottom of this page.

Please note that we may share the identity and information in any copyright infringement claim we receive with the alleged infringer. In submitting a claim, you understand and accept that your identity and claim may be communicated to the alleged infringer.

 

Counter Notification – Restoration of Material

If you have received a notice of material being taken down because of a copyright infringement claim, you may provide us with a counter notification in an effort to have the material in question restored to the site. Said notification must be given in writing and must contain substantially the following elements pursuant to 17 USC Section 512(g)(3):

  1. Your physical or electronic signature.
  2. A description of the material that has been taken down and the original location of the material before it was taken down.
  3. A statement under penalty of perjury that you have a good faith belief that the material was removed or disabled as a result of mistake or misidentification of the material to be removed or disabled.
  4. Your name, address, and telephone number, and a statement that you consent to the jurisdiction of the federal district court for the judicial district in which the address is located (or if you are outside of the United States, that you consent to jurisdiction of any judicial district in which the service provider may be found), and that you will accept service of process from the person or company who provided the original infringement notification.
  5. Send your counter notice to the email provided, both at the top and bottom of this page.

 

Repeat Infringer Policy

We take copyright infringement very seriously. Pursuant to the repeat infringer policy requirements of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, we maintain a list of DMCA notices from copyright holders and make a good faith effort to identify any repeat infringers pursuant to the safe harbor requirements of the DMCA. Those that violate our internal repeat infringer policy will have their accounts terminated.

 

Modifications

We reserve the right to modify the contents of this page and its policy for handling DMCA claims at any time for any reason. You are encouraged to check back to review this policy frequently for any changes.

 

EMAIL: [email protected]

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